Tag Archives: Jane Austen

Romantic quote #3

Why can’t I find other  quotes by other authors? The first two are both by Austen and this third one is still by her so it’s high time I should post something else already.  Her words are nonetheless great so I don’t think I should restrain from sharing. Besides, it’s Mr. Darcy (the one and only) who said these words so there should definitely be no qualms on posting it.

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Romantic quote #2

I was going to save this for last but it melts my heart too much that I can’t hold it back any longer. This was written by Frederick Wentworth to Anne Elliot on Persuasion.

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Romantic quote #1

Now that it’s the month of love, I think it’s the perfect opportunity to share some of the most romantic words I’ve come across in literature. I’m willing to dig through my classic titles to find a few of the best but for now, here’s one.

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On to Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair is turning out to be promising (nothing less from a classic, of course), and I’m once again resisting the urge to pick up my orange highlighter and make horizontal marks on its wise passages.

Let me share one:

The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly, kind companion; and so let all young persons take their choice.

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I’m currently on the third chapter and I still couldn’t get over what Rebecca Sharp did in the first one. If you must know, while there seemed to be no friends fussing over her departure from Chiswick Mall, there was actually one who had the sincerest intents for her goodwill and that was Miss Jemima. You see, this kindhearted lady took the effort of sending her off with a dictionary and while Miss Jemima assumed Miss Sharp would accept it with heartfelt gratitude, the latter heartlessly threw it off as the carriage was leaving the gates of their school. I was so surprised about this, years of reading Austen did not prepare me for such conduct.

Early on, Rebecca Sharp is indeed the antithesis of all of Austen’s heroines.

If only she wrote more

In the span of three long years, I was able to read Austen’s six completed novels and now that it’s over, I kind of regret shunning her once. I miss the eligible gentlemen, the lovely ladies, the lavish balls, the grandiose appearances, and the like. I miss Austen. Reading her again will only make me long for more of her social satires.

Sure there may be novels with ladies who are just as charming as Elizabeth or Emma and gentlemen who are as noble as Darcy or Knightley but let’s face it, no one does it better than Austen. I recently purchased William Makepeace Thackeray’s Vanity Fair with high hopes that I might rekindle the joy of reading social satires but since there is no hero in this story, I sort of miss the romantic gratifications, as well.

How I wish Austen wrote more. That would have made some of us happy.

 

 

How Austen keeps coming back

Although I have mentioned I was reading As I Lay Dying, I have also said how Faulkner’s stream of consciousness technique was driving me mad and yes, it drove me to the point of putting it down for now. After all, readers have every right not to finish a book. I’ve done that, I’m still doing that, and I will definitely do it again. If I didn’t do it before, I would not have given the gratification Sense and Sensibility rightfully deserves (I was able to finish it five months after temporarily putting it down).

I don’t know if it’s just me but I don’t think it’s a good idea to read Austen in a row. Don’t get me wrong, I adore her well-painted characters and witty story lines very much — I really do — but starting on Sense and Sensibility after having just finished Emma made me so sick of balls, tea parties, gossips, four-thousand-pounds-a-years, and post-chaises that I actually shunned Austen for a while.

A few days ago, as I was looking for a good book to recommend to my father, I found Mansfield Park standing on the edge of the shelf. I remember buying that in the midst of my Pride and Prejudice amazement and abandoning it after realizing Fanny Price wasn’t as interesting as Elizabeth Bennet. This happened a few years ago and up until now, I completely forgot about it. Having not read any Austen for a few months, I resumed on Mansfield Park just as easily as giving up on it. Now that reality is drowning my literary heroes, I’m contemplating on Fanny Price as it should be. Who knows, she might revive the heroes this darn reality is sedating.

I’m not done with it yet, I’m really hoping I won’t give up on it anymore. Actually its characters are interesting enough to attach me so I don’t think I would.