Tag Archives: William Faulkner

London Below

Is The Sound and the Fury more readable than As I Lay Dying? Would reading the former put William Faulkner in my most-honored-authors list? I hope so. I want to like Faulkner so bad but I feel like I won’t be able to finish his most profound work since I haven’t even resumed on As I Lay Dying in six months!

Anyway … on to the first novel I finished for the year 2014 — Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere. I’ve been a fan of Gaiman since reading American Gods (this I did about four years ago) and it was only on December last year that I got my hands on another one of his works. I won’t go on about its plot, I was never fond of giving summaries and all. I’m just here to dote on some of the characters. I initially thought Door (such a beautiful name, don’t you think? I want to nickname my child after her) was just another helpless soul cast about in the world but her ability and cunning intrigued me immensely. Her image in my head was never as distinct as Richard’s (I was honestly picturing James McAvoy all the while, more on that later), I imagined her looking like, with her short red hair and all, Leeloo from The Fifth Element wearing the animated Anya’s (Anastasia) tattered brown coat. I know it’s poorly imagined, I admit that but my imagination has not been functioning well lately.  

And Richard. Richard Mayhew. Dick. Yes, like I said, I was imagining McAvoy all the while and I was even more surprised to find that that gorgeous actor actually voiced him in the radio drama adaptation! Can’t wait to listen to that!   >.<

Croup and Vandemar were really good in sending chills down my spine, I couldn’t help but feel apprehensive every time I’m on their page. It seemed as though they couldn’t live a day without cutting off somebody’s fingers and that creeped me a lot. I imagined Croup with the Cheshire cat’s voice and Vandemar with Lurch’s (Addams Family).

The one that gripped me most was actually Islington, the way he was introduced was just so beautifully written that I didn’t assume anything evil about it. When he spoke, I heard Orlando Bloom’s voice all over but on checking out the cast of the radio drama, I died.

You can read a story to me anytime, Islington. :3

You can read a story to me anytime, Islington. :3

Okay, that wasn’t so insightful but then again, my posts were never insightful. Cheers to Neverwhere!

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Three down, six to go

Wow. It’s been almost eight months since my last post and as much as I want to say that I read a good amount of classics, I can’t. For now I guess it’s safe to say that I’ve been busy (my current job has kept my hands full) but I’ve tried stealing some time to read a few from my heap.

I have a list of the books I hoarded and I crossed out those I’ve obviously read.

1. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

2. What’s Your Name I’m Fine Thank You by Roger Beaumont

3. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

4. The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

5. The Piano Shop on the Left Bank by Thad Carhart

6. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

7. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

8. The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler

9. The Swiss Family Robinson by Johann Wyss

Oh yes. After years of searching, I finally found Faulkner! I remember feeling elated when I saw his name on the shelf. Funny story — because I was too excited to buy it, I didn’t give a care about its cover; it was only after two months did I realize how creepy it was! I tried looking at it in dim lighting but that wasn’t such a good idea, so I decided to cover it up with a drawing. Despite that, however, this is what I’m currently reading and Faulkner’s stream of consciousness technique is driving me nuts.

I might regret posting this picture.

I might regret posting this picture. -_-

The two Robinsons are back-to-back hard bounds which I found in my father’s old home; he said it was the first book his own father gave him… I know, how could I be in my twenties and still have not read these two? Back to my tagline, I’m still catching up. Speaking of which, that’s exactly what I would be doing.